What are some common natural gardening mistakes?

When natural gardeners are asked about their biggest gardening mistake, one answer is heard over and over: trying to do everything at once.

Their enthusiasm is commendable. After all, natural yards are beautiful and peaceful, they provide habitat for wildlife, they take less work in the long run, they are good for the environment, and they benefit our health in countless ways. Who wouldn’t want one right now?

One of the biggest obstacles to establishing a natural yard, however, is the amount of work they require upfront. The aspiring natural gardener has to learn about native plants and the site conditions they prefer, survey their own site conditions, make a garden plan, eliminate existing non-natives, bring in the new plantings, discourage the invasives that try to move back in, and many other tasks. In many natural yards, all of this work is done personally and by hand, rather than by hiring other people or fossil-fuel-powered machines to help with the labor.

Thus, for any but the tiniest of yards, the gardener can quickly become overwhelmed by the amount of work that needs to be done all at the same time. Aspects of the planting begin to fail. (In a natural yard, it’s accepted that some things will fail, but trying to rush through the establishment phase tends to lead to more failure than necessary.) The gardener has run out of money, resources, and energy to do the project over again. Pretty soon, they’re left with a big mess.

For this reason, experienced natural gardeners advise newcomers to make an overall plan, then tackle one aspect at a time. It’s generally wise to start with trees and shrubs, which take the longest to become established, and add smaller plants later. Or, the beginning gardener could begin with the areas closest to the house, and work outwards. As each piece of the plan becomes self-sustaining, the gardener becomes free to devote their energy to the next stage of the process.

Another mistake worth mentioning is declaring failure too soon. As mentioned in the previous post, new plantings may take several years to start looking good. Seeds may not germinate in the first year. Seeds that do germinate may look like weeds. Transplants may appear to have not survived their relocation.

All of these are normal parts of the establishment process. Seeds will germinate when they are ready, seedlings will mature into beautiful plants, and transplants will jettison their leaves, focus on getting their roots settled, and grow back the next year. By patiently waiting out these awkward stages, a gardener can avoid unnecessary rework.

Part of the joy of having a natural yard is the satisfaction of learning about native plants through hands-on experience. It’s not necessary to be an expert on natural gardening before beginning to establish plantings in our own yards. But by arming ourselves with a little awareness of others’ mistakes, we can increase our own chances of speedy success.

What are some common natural gardening mistakes?

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