How can one yard make a difference?

In some respects, sustainable gardening is what’s known as a collective action problem: a challenge in which many people need to work together to enact a solution, and in which the first few people to act incur high costs while receiving few, if any, benefits. These problems are difficult to solve because everyone needs to act, but no one wants to act first.

In the case of sustainable gardening, the first person on the block to plant native wildflowers, or not rake their leaves in the fall, or even just set their lawnmower blade to four inches high (it really is better for the grass) could end up getting criticized – or worse – by their neighbors, while the positive impact they’re having on the environment seems like hardly a drop in the bucket compared to the serious problems our planet is facing. Under such circumstances, who would want to be a trendsetter? Even if our neighbors nod politely at our efforts, isn’t one yard just too small to make a difference?

That Blogger had an opportunity to put these questions to Doug Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware and a well-known advocate of natural yards, just a few months before That Blog was launched. Here are his answers.

Can one yard make any difference to nature?

Less than one yard can make a difference, Tallamy said. Even a few flowers on a balcony or in a window box can provide a valuable foraging stop for butterflies and other pollinators. And a space the size of a bedroom can have real, measurable benefits for these small creatures. A 15-by-15-foot garden in the completely enclosed courtyard of the Department of Agriculture building in Dover, Delaware, became a nursery for no fewer than 150 monarch caterpillars, when employees in the building simply chose to use that space for milkweed rather than for grass.

What if we just don’t put nature in our yards?

“We no longer have the option of opting out,” Tallamy said bluntly. “Most people do not have viable habitat [in their yards], and we’re seeing a steady drain of species from our ecosystems.”

As those species vanish, the ecosystem services they provide disappear too. That’s a serious problem for us humans, Tallamy said. If we want to safeguard our own survival, we need to do something now. Once the species we exclude from our yards are extinct, we can’t bring them back.

Do enough people have nature in their yards?

No, Tallamy said. But we’re getting closer to the critical threshold of solving this collective action problem.

Sustainable gardening is “certainly not mainstream yet,” Tallamy said (speaking in early 2015), “but it’s headed in that direction. I’m optimistic. We have turned the corner much faster than I thought we would have.”

But seriously. One yard?

Tallamy turned the question on its head, pointing out that regardless of property lines, we don’t need to think in terms of just one yard. Our next-door neighbor has a yard. Their neighbor on the other side has a yard. There are yards all the way down the block and into the next town and across the country. We can invite all of those neighbors to join us in our efforts to garden with nature. We can encourage landlords of apartment buildings to landscape their grounds with native plants instead of with lawn. We can pressure our local officials to plant more street trees and spray fewer pesticides.

When we have the courage to be a trendsetter, we are not small. And we can make a difference.

How can one yard make a difference?

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