Do people want lawns?

If you are thinking that you would like to throw out your lawnmower and fill your yard with native plants, you are not alone. The facts – about how lawns waste water, pollute the atmosphere, poison us, trample on wildlife habitat, and take our time and money without giving anything back – are making their way into the public consciousness. Surely there are some people who genuinely like lawns. But, even as lawns continue to be a default landscaping choice in many new developments, as outdated local regulations continue to favor and protect lawns, and as that one turf lover in every neighborhood tries to shame and bully others into mowing their grass, more and more Americans are taking the stance that lawns just don’t make sense. Though not all of those people have yet had the courage to take this stance publicly by changing how they garden, here are three statistics showing that views on natural yards are changing dramatically.

People hate mowing the lawn. In the fall of 2011, CBS News surveyed Americans about their least favorite chores. 20% of the people surveyed said that mowing the lawn was the chore they hated most, making lawnmowing the least popular chore in America. According to this poll, mowing was less liked than other types of tedious yardwork, including raking leaves and shoveling snow.

It’s worth noting that this survey presumably included people who don’t have lawns – meaning that among those Americans who do have lawns, even more than 20% hated mowing above all their other domestic tasks.

People really hate leafblowers. Somewhere prior to 2002, a Learning Channel documentary reported that people named leafblowers as the third-worst invention ever. In a survey about terrible technology, only parking meters and car alarms earned more votes for being awful inventions.

Leafblowers are not needed in natural yards, for the simple reason that natural yards have no “yard waste” that needs to be blown away. Fallen leaves, grass clippings, and other discarded plant parts are recognized as valuable resources that can be either left in place or quietly gathered into a compost pile, to fulfill their destiny and return to the soil.

People want more native plants. In 2008, a survey by Consumer Reports found that a respectable 26% of American homeowners wanted to replace at least some of their lawn with “flowers, rocks, or native landscaping.” More recently, the number of homeowners who want to plant natives in their yards has climbed to a whopping 84%, according to a survey  by the American Society of Landscape Architects. In this survey, homeowners also named planting drought-resistant species and establishing low-maintenance landscapes as changes they would like to make in their yards.

Natural yards are no longer a fringe gardening choice. They are not being adopted by people who “just like plants”; they are being mindfully established by homeowners who recognize the overwhelming evidence that yards that are in harmony with nature are better for the environment, our health, our community, and our pocketbooks.

Put native plants in your yard. Tell people why gardening this way is important to you. You are in good company.

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Do people want lawns?

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