How can we help plants?

In conventional gardening, plants are treated like yard furniture: inanimate objects that we can arrange and modify to suit our own preferences, and which will quickly fall into a degenerate state if we don’t constantly maintain them. This is, of course, biologically inaccurate. With a few exceptions, even highly cultivated plants are essentially wild creatures that, given appropriate growing conditions, can take care of all their own needs. Plants don’t require our help.

How do we know that this is so? Quite simply, because plants thrived on Earth for million of years before humans appeared on the scene. In contrast, humans literally would not survive for one day without plants.

Some people, in recognition of this fact, truly want to repay plants by helping them out. This is wonderful. However, many of the things that people do – with the best of intentions – to help plants are in fact harmful to plants. Pruning plants robs them of their food-producing ability and leaves them vulnerable to disease. Situating plants in a sea of mulch deprives them of the companions they need to be healthy. And spraying them with pesticides kills the insects the plants rely on for their reproductive processes.

There are some things we can do to help plants, though. Here are three simple actions with real benefits for plants.

Breathe on them. We know that animals take in oxygen and breathe out carbon, while plants absorb carbon and give off oxygen. We usually describe this harmonious dynamic by saying that plants clean the air for us. It is fascinating to realize that from a plant’s perspective, we clean the air for them! By breathing on plants, we can provide them with a little boost of the carbon they need to build their bodies. (It is thought that this is why some people swear plants grow better if you talk to them. It’s not the words we’re saying that benefit the plants; it’s the air we’re blowing on them.)

Relieve yourself on them. As described in a recent post, human bodily waste is full of nitrogen, a nutrient plants need. When we excrete on plants, we deposit nitrogen in a form plants can use. In contrast, when we excrete in modern toilets, we deposit nitrogen into the water supply, where it contributes to harmful effects. (Unless you are way out in the woods, though, don’t literally excrete on plants. Find a happy medium in the humanure process.)

Don’t walk near them. Some plants like to be walked near: for example, those that stick their seeds to our pants and let us disperse their offspring. For the most part, though, walking near plants only contributes to soil compaction and damages the plants’ roots. Resist the urge to hug trees. Instead, tell them loudly, from a respectful distance, how much you appreciate their service. They’ll enjoy the extra carbon more than they would the warm embrace.

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How can we help plants?

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